Japan marks the 63rd anniversary of the atomic blast that obliterated Hiroshima and killed 140,000 people. Following are some facts about the bombing of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japan surrendered on August 15, 1945, bringing World War II to an end.
At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, an American B-29 Superfortress bomber Enola Gay dropped a 10,000-pound uranium 235 bomb on Hiroshima, instantly killing about 78,000 people. By the end of 1945, the number of dead had reached about 140,000 out of an estimated population of 350,000.
The bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy," exploded about 600 meters above the center of the city, setting off a surge of heat reaching 4,000 degrees Celsius (7,200 Fahrenheit) across a radius of about 4.5 km (2.8 miles).
Three days later, at 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945, the United States dropped a 10,000-pound plutonium-239 bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man", on Nagasaki.
It exploded about 500 meters above the ground, instantly killing about 27,000 of the city's estimated population of around 200,000. By the end of 1945, the number of dead due to acute radiation exposure reached about 70,000.
Japan has so far recognized the total number of victims who died of radiation illness and injuries in Hiroshima as 253,008 and in Nagasaki as 143,124.
Apart from this, last year the city of Hiroshima added for the first time the words "Many Unknown" to the ledger of the victims' names placed in a container at the cenotaph of the Peace Memorial Park.