Atlantic crash bodies identified

Only 50 bodies from the Air France crash have been recovered so far

Officials in Brazil have identified the first 11 of 50 bodies recovered from the Air France disaster in which 228 people died three weeks ago.
The bodies were those of 10 Brazilians and one male foreigner, officials said. They gave no further details.
The Airbus A330 plunged into the Atlantic on 1 June. The data recorders have not been found, and the cause of the crash remains a mystery.
Search teams from several countries are still scanning the search area.
Investigators are examining the bodies and debris at a base set up in the northern Brazilian city of Recife.
Five of the victims were identified as Brazilian men, five as Brazilian women and one as a "foreigner of the male sex", local officials said on Sunday. The nationality of the foreigner has not been revealed.
DNA samples
Dental records, fingerprints and DNA samples were used to identify the bodies, a statement said.
Families of the Brazilian victims and the embassy in Brazil representing the foreigner's home country have been notified, the statement added, but the identities will not be publicised in keeping with relatives' wishes.
Debris from the plane is being brought back to Recife

Speculation about what caused the plane to go down between Rio de Janeiro and Paris has so far focused on the possibility that the airspeed sensors were not working.
The plane is known to have registered inconsistent speed readings just before it crashed in turbulent weather.
The plane's "black boxes" can emit an electronic tracking signal for about 30 days and French-chartered ships are scouring the search area pulling US Navy underwater listening devices.
A French nuclear submarine is also involved in the search for the recorders, which could be up to 6,100m (20,000ft) deep, on the bed of the Atlantic.
US and Brazilian officials said on Sunday that so far no signals had been picked up.